(via npr)

nyantolo:

icecreamandchicken:

But it’s rush week. So, y’all sleep.

Say that!

(via goshnicole)

thesexqueen:

tiger03lily:

wrapyourlipsaroundmyname:

badgalfaashion:

brainy-beauty:

inmytwistedfairytale:

HE HANDED THAT SHIT TO HIMMMMM

Farrakhan does not fear man. Amen.

DANM!!

I think this make the 10th time ive reblogged this 

amazing

How to passionately respond to American ethnocentrism. This guy has some amazing points, and if you find the need to argue him, I’d recommend investigating ethnocentrism, and aversive racism.

(via n0more-nonsense)

jtotheizzoe:

colchrishadfield:

21,000 years ago, the ice over Montreal was 3 kilometers thick, and dwarfed the Sears and CN Towers. The land is still rising back up like a sponge from the great weight of the ice. Conditions changing over time. (xkcd)

So which one is Winterfell, Toronto or Montreal?

Toronto is Winterfell. Montreal is north of the wall.

I have no mercy or compassion in me for a society that will crush people, and then penalize them for not being able to stand under the weight.

Malcolm X | The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1964)

(via cpablo)

nprmusic:

You ever look back on your life and wonder, “What did I ever do?” And then you watch a bunch of teenagers nail Porgy and Bess┐(・。・┐) ♪

(via npr)

(via realgoodgirl)

skunkbear:

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.

(via npr)

newyorker:

A cartoon by Roz Chast. For more cartoons from this week’s issue of the magazine: http://nyr.kr/1kxUOii

(via npr)

oliviamaest:

these rule so hard.

(via cpablo)

(via jennifer-pablo)

(via mikerugnetta)

black-and-white:

Grand Central 2/3 (by Barry Yanowitz)

When I was a child, it was believed that animals became extinct because they were too specialized. My father used to tell us about the saber-tooth tiger’s teeth — how they got too big and the tiger couldn’t eat because he couldn’t take game anymore. And I remember my father saying, with my brother sitting there, ‘I wonder what it will be with the human beings that will be so overspecialized that they’ll kill themselves off?’

My father never found out that my brother was working on the bomb.

Richard Feynman’s sister, Joan (via historical-nonfiction)

Well, then.

(via jtotheizzoe)

(via jtotheizzoe)

thingsfittingperfectlyintothings:

cats + things